Patriotism. A project by Misha Friedman and IMR

Ukrainian Refugees: Between Propaganda and Reality
15 July 2014

Thousands of Ukrainian refugees fled to Russia as a result of military operations in the southern and eastern Ukraine. As the Kremlin manipulates the refugees factor in its propaganda campaign against Ukraine, the real scale of the problem remains unclear. Political analyst Tatiana Stanovaya discusses the current situation.

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The Young Guard, or “Russification of the Spirit” Part 2
09 July 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known scholar Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism in the USSR. In this second part of his essay on right-wing dissidents, Yanov examines an article titled “Inevitability” by “Young Guardsman” Victor Chalmaev that sparked heated debates in every ideological circle of the time.

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Totalitarianism and Freedom of Speech
24 June 2014

The unbridled propaganda war waged around the Ukrainian crisis once again raises the question of independence of the media. According to journalist Alexander Podrabinek, the purging of information space could be avoided if the international community promptly and decisively reacted to the first signs of suppression of freedom of speech in Russia.

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The Young Guard, or “Russification of the Spirit”
19 June 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known historian Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism in the USSR. In this essay, he analyzes the ideological rationale of right-wing dissidents in the late 1960s, the mouthpiece of which was Young Guard magazine.

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VSKhSON: the “Russian Path” to Freedom
05 June 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known historian Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism in the Soviet Union. In this essay, the author analyzes the ideology of VSKhSON—the All-Russian Social-Christian Union for the Liberation of the People.

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Nationalism in Soviet Russia: The New Wave
16 May 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known historian Alexander Yanov dedicated to the history of Russian nationalism in the Soviet Union. In this essay, the author discusses the change of the cultural code in the 1960s and the revival of nationalism in Soviet Russia.

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Has Patriotism in Russia Been Hijacked?
09 May 2014

Patriotism has been officially named as one of the uniting foundations of the Russian state. However, it seems that Russian authorities are trying to monopolize the notion of patriotism in order to advance their own agenda. What remains excluded from the official discourse is how the Russian public understands patriotism. IMR Advisor Boris Bruk delves into this complicated issue and concludes that, in the current political environment, the concept of Russian patriotism has developed negative features of nationalism, xenophobia, and intolerance toward others.

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The Birth of Imperial National Communism
30 April 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known historian Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism. This essay begins a new cycle of the series: the history of the Russian idea in the Soviet Union. The author discusses what happened with the Russian idea in the first decade after the Russian Revolution, both in Russia and abroad.

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In Search of Lost Ideology
25 April 2014

The Constitution of the Russian Federation unequivocally bans the establishment of a state ideology. However, the recent conservative trend in Russian politics increasingly resembles a regime-supported official ideology. According to political analyst Tatiana Stanovaya, the crisis in Ukraine served as a powerful boost to the creation of a new ideological base for Vladimir Putin’s regime.

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The Czar’s Last Mistake, Part Two
10 April 2014

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism. The current essay is published in two parts. In the first part, the author argues that Czar Nicholas I brought Russia to the outbreak of the fatal Crimean War of 1853–56. Part two explains why this war is portrayed as a “conspiracy against Russia” in Russian history textbooks.

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