Patriotism. A project by Misha Friedman and IMR

The Bolotnaya Case: Another Guilty Verdict
Written by Institute of Modern Russia

The Bolotnaya Case: Another Guilty Verdict

On July 24, Moscow District Court found Sergei Udaltsov and Leonid Razvozzhayev, activists of the Left Front movement, guilty of organizing mass riots at Bolotnaya Square on May 6, 2012. Both defendents were sentenced to four and a half years in penalty colony. Upon IMR's request, Yulia Polukhina, Novaya Gazeta correspondent, who covered the trial from the beginning, sums up this politically motivated case.

 
Russia’s Mistral Deal: Where the Wind Blows
Written by Elena Servettaz

Russia’s Mistral Deal: Where the Wind Blows

Since the beginning of the Ukraine crisis, the West has been increasingly concerned about the delivery of two French Mistral-class helicopter carriers to Russia. With the third round of sanctions on the way, Paris’s continued insistence on delivering the carriers has brought a note of discord to the West’s general strategy of countering Russian aggression in Ukraine. Paris-based journalist Elena Servettaz discusses the controversial deal.

 
Ukrainian Refugees: Between Propaganda and Reality
Written by Tatiana Stanovaya

Ukrainian Refugees: Between Propaganda and Reality

Thousands of Ukrainian refugees fled to Russia as a result of military operations in the southern and eastern Ukraine. As the Kremlin manipulates the refugees factor in its propaganda campaign against Ukraine, the real scale of the problem remains unclear. Political analyst Tatiana Stanovaya discusses the current situation.

 
New Russian Laws: Can a “Like” Really Send You to Prison?
Written by Alexander Podrabinek

New Russian Laws: Can a “Like” Really Send You to Prison?

On June 30, president Vladimir Putin signed a law introducing several legislative amendments directed at toughening Russia’s laws on fighting extremism. These include imprisonment for funding extremist activities and calling for extremism via the Internet. Analyst Alexander Podrabinek argues that this law is hardly new, and that its goal is to instill nervousness in the public.

 
Russia Approves New U.S. Envoy
Written by Donald N. Jensen

Russia Approves New U.S. Envoy

On July 9, the Kremlin formally approved the appointment of John Tefft as the next U.S. ambassador to Russia. In an atmosphere of crisis between Russia and the West not seen since the end of the Cold War, Tefft faces a hard task. However, as Donald N. Jensen, resident fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, argues, no ambitious new campaign to improve the U.S.-Russia relationship is on the horizon. On the contrary, the United States is likely to seek to minimize cooperation with Russia.

 
Russia’s Political Prisoners: Ilya Gushchin
Written by Boris Bruk

Russia’s Political Prisoners: Ilya Gushchin

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles dedicated to Russian political prisoners with a portrait of Ilya Gushchin, opposition activist, member of the National Democratic Party, and defendant in the “second wave” of the Bolotnaya trials.

 
The Young Guard, or “Russification of the Spirit” Part 2
Written by Alexander Yanov

The Young Guard, or “Russification of the Spirit” Part 2

The Institute of Modern Russia continues its series of articles by well-known scholar Alexander Yanov on the history of Russian nationalism in the USSR. In this second part of his essay on right-wing dissidents, Yanov examines an article titled “Inevitability” by “Young Guardsman” Victor Chalmaev that sparked heated debates in every ideological circle of the time.

 
Russia’s Prosecutor General’s Office Takes On Corruption
Written by Ekaterina Mishina

Russia’s Prosecutor General’s Office Takes On Corruption

In early June, the Prosecutor General’s Office published a draft law “On Amendments to the Legislation of the Russian Federation to Strengthen Responsibility for Corruption.” IMR legal expert Ekaterina Mishina analyzes the proposed changes.

 
Putin Forever?
Written by Donald N. Jensen

Putin Forever?

As public support of Vladimir Putin’s policies skyrockets, political analysts observe increasing discontent among Russian elites. Rumors of elite efforts to oust Putin are being discussed behind the political scene. However, as Donald N. Jensen, resident fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, argues, despite systemic tensions, Putin has a number of advantages that will likely see him through these difficulties.

 
The Third Gas War
Written by Institute of Modern Russia

The Third Gas War

The Russian-Ukrainian gas conflict that started in April has recently entered a critical phase. On June 16, Russian gas monopoly Gazprom halted transportation of gas to Ukraine, demanding that Ukraine pay its debt of almost $2 billion. And last Friday, Gazprom’s CEO Alexei Miller threatened to take measures against European companies that participate in reverse gas supplies to Ukraine. IMR analysts Tatiana Stanovaya and Olga Khvostunova analyze the specifics of the latest gas war.