20 years under Putin: a timeline

On November 17th, the Institute of Modern Russia will host a roundtable discussion on Russia’s government corruption as part of the annual convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

 

 

On November 17th, the Institute of Modern Russia will host a roundtable discussion on Russia’s government corruption as part of the annual convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

On November 15th to 18th, the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) – America’s leading scholarly society dedicated to the former Eastern Bloc – will hold its 44th annual convention in New Orleans, La.

On November 17th, the Institute of Modern Russia (IMR), as a member of ASEEES, will host a roundtable discussion on corruption, one of the most pressing issues for Russia and other post-Communist states. In 1996, Russia ranked 46th in Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index; in 2011, it dropped to 143rd place (of 182).

The IMR roundtable will feature:

  • Vladimir Rimsky, head of the sociology department at the Information Science for Democracy Foundation (Russia)
  • Evgeniya Khilji, Program Assistant at the Eurasia Foundation (U.S.), Freelance IMR Analyst
  • Sasha de Vogel, M.A. Candidate, Columbia University (U.S.)

Vladimir Rimsky will address corruption in the Russian education system: in his view, corruption in Russia has become a social norm that provides the basis for the relations between citizens and state. Corruption in education leads to discrimination on the basis of social status and living standards, and violates the Russian Constitution which guarantees the right to education and general access to pre-school, secondary and vocational education in state or municipal establishments.

Evgeniya Khilji’s report will be focused on corruption and nepotism in post-Soviet Russia; she will present findings from the case studies of former Telecommunications Minister Leonid Reiman and “Russian spy” Anna Chapman, the daughter of a high-ranking KGB officer.

Sasha de Vogel will address Russia’s new federal law “On Police” and will present research findings related to its development and effectiveness.

The preliminary convention program is available on the ASEEES website.

Russia under Putin

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